Egypt Says EU Parliament’s Resolution ‘Carries Unacceptable Overtones’

By Aswat Masriya

Cairo - Egypt's foreign ministry rejected on Friday the European Parliament's statements on torture and enforced disappearances in Egypt, claiming they were not backed by any "evidence."

"Breaking into Regeni's murder case in a resolution that addresses the human rights situation in Egypt carries unacceptable overtones, and it precedes the investigation that the Egyptian authorities is currently undertaking with the full cooperation of Italian authorities," the ministry said.

The European Parliament approved with an overwhelming majority on Thursday a resolution condemning the human rights situation in Egypt, with particular emphasis on the demand for an investigation into the case of murdered Ph.D. student GiulioRegeni.

The resolution described the torture and murder of Regeni, who was found killed in a Cairo desert road ten days after his disappearance, as having taken place in a wider "context of torture, death in custody and enforced disappearances."

The parliament's decision "depends on talks and allegations that are not backed by evidence," the Egyptian foreign ministry said in its statement.

The European Parliament called for the "suspension of any form of security cooperation and assistance with Egyptian authorities, as long as its security apparatus continues to fuel radicalism and violent extremism through its systematic violations committed in full-impunity."

"It is unfortunate that old legislative institutions such as the European Parliament take unreliable accusations and media reports that are handed in as facts and hard evidence, as the basis on which to issue parliamentary decisions," the ministry added.

"The case of Giulio Regeni is just another cruel and gruesome example of the current worrisome situation of human rights in Egypt," Elene Valenciano, chair of the human rights subcommittee, had commented.

In its 2016 World Report, the US-based watchdog Human Rights Watch (HRW) recounted security force abuses, which included "dozens of enforced disappearances, often targeting political activists", scores of Egyptians banned from travel and the regular use of torture by police in their investigations.

Source: EMM